Viagenco is a non-profit home health and palliative care agency, started in 2002, which serves a poor rural population. Over the course of the past several years, Viagenco has developed a permanent, outpatient clinic at Luanda in Western Kenya, on the shores of Lake Victoria, between the towns of Homa Bay and Mbita. The clinic has a 12 bed in-patient facility, a home based palliative care program, and an HIV outreach program for testing and counselling.

The Kenya project is a partnership between EWB@UCSB, two Santa Barbara NGO's, and a community organization from Kenya called Viagenco. Viagenco (representing the words Lake Victoria Agricultural & Environmental Conservation) was started in 1997 by three men from the Gembe region of Kenya with a vision of improving their community. Gembe is a very poor, rural area of subsistence farmers and the idea was to improve farming practices while conserving the environment. The founders soon discovered, however, that the community was so devastated by health issues such as HIV/AIDS and malaria that there could not be a focus on the environment until these health issues were addressed. Thus, a small health clinic was established in conjunction with nearby government agencies to attempt to meet the needs of the community. In 2004, Viagenco and Visiting Nurse & Hospice Care of Santa Barbara (VNHCSB) became partners through the Foundation of Hospices in sub-Saharan Africa. Viagenco has since been financially assisted by VNHCSB to establish an independent health care program which consists of a small health clinic staffed by a clinical officer, nurse, lab technician, pharmacy technician and support staff. The program also provides home based palliative care to people living with HIV/AIDS and other terminal illnesses, an in-patient facility accommodating about 12 patients for overnight stays and an HIV outreach program which helps to identify and counsel people with HIV. Lastly, it supports children orphaned by the AIDS epidemic and is connected to a local Voluntary Counseling and testing program and a mother-to-child-transmission prevention program. Altogether the clinic serves the 5,000 or so people living in the Gembe region. The need at present is to improve the facility. The clinic buildings are currently made from